The difference between the embroidered Adidas logo at the back and the stuck-on Ems-Griltech logo at the front can easily be seen.

It’s only logo …

Some Techtextil exhibitors are getting football stars like Ronaldo, Messi, Neymar and many other well-known players to promote their products. How do they do that?

“Whenever the Football World Cup or European Championships are on, our business booms”, says Peter Kemper, Regional Manager for Coatings and Additives with the Swiss firm of Ems-Griltech. The company specialises in the development and production of fibres, melt adhesives and bonding yarns for technical and textile applications. And because the logo manufacturers, who work with the big sportswear manufacturers to stick logos on sports shirts, are some of their major customers, orders at Ems-Griltech can be guaranteed to spiral upwards at the events mentioned above.

But why aren’t these logos sewn on? “That would take much too long”, says Kemper unequivocally. The motto then is: ‘stick not sew’ (or embroider). And the peculiar thing about it is that, because polyester, the world’s major artificial fibre, has a melting point of around 250 degrees centigrade, the melting point of the adhesive used must be well below that. “Otherwise the fibres burn”, says Kemper. Textile adhesives must, therefore, be specifically ‘adapted’ in terms of melting point during the technical development.

Flowerpots you can stick together

For Techtextil exhibitor Lohmann, too, sticking textiles is preferable to sewing them. The adhesive-tape manufacturers from Neuwied have come up with a special (green) ‘give away’ for the show: a flowerpot that you can stick together. The trade visitors to the show also get given the soil and seeds to go in it – nasturtium seeds. Instead of faux-leather plant pots, though, Lohmann double-sided adhesive tapes are normally found holding together kites and layers of Kevlar in bullet-proof vests; or – there seems to be no getting away from sport today! – they’re used for sticking individual layers of fabric in sports shoes. Mmm! I wonder if they know at the Lohmann stand, that some varieties of nasturtium grow up to three metres tall!

Textiles replace terracotta: growth rates for technical textiles are not the only things that are on their way upwards at the Lohman stand. There are nasturtium seeds growing too!

Textiles replace terracotta: growth rates for technical textiles are not the only things that are on their way upwards at the Lohman stand. There are nasturtium seeds growing too!

About the cover image: the difference between the embroidered Adidas logo at the back and the stuck-on Ems-Griltech logo at the front can easily be seen.

Ronny Eckert

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